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5,377 Views
Registered: ‎10-24-2011

Xilinx FPGA Commercial vs. Industrial Reliability?

I am trying to determine if I can switch from a Xilinx Industrial Grade FPGA to a Commercial Grade FPGA. 

Temperature wise a Commercial Grade part would work.  The component will see ~70°C while running.

 

Question:

1.  Is there a report posted anywhere that shows the reliability differences between a Xilinx Commercial and Industrial FPGA running side by side at the same temperature? (Xilinx's reliability report UG116 does not make the distinction between commercial and industrial)

 

2.  Does anyone have any experience making a similar transition from Industrial to Commercial graded parts? 

 

Thanks in Advance,

Nathan

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5 Replies
Scholar austin
Scholar
5,370 Views
Registered: ‎02-27-2008

Re: Xilinx FPGA Commercial vs. Industrial Reliability?

n,

70 C ambient is not going to be less than 85 C junction, unless you have a very good heatsink!

The I grade, and C grade parts are identical masks, process.

The process determines the reliability, not the ink marking on the case.

So, running I grade at 85C junction, and C grade at 85C junction will have identical reliability (statistically, over the long run, over thousands of parts, and tens of years).

Running a I grade part at 100C will be just as reliable as running a C grade part at 100C, except that we didn't test or speedgrade the C grade part at 100C, so it may, or may not work there (and we did not guarantee it, and specifically discourage you to use a C grade part in an I grade environment).

Austin Lesea
Principal Engineer
Xilinx San Jose
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5,358 Views
Registered: ‎10-24-2011

Re: Xilinx FPGA Commercial vs. Industrial Reliability?

Austin,

Thanks for your quick response.

The requirements for my application are 50C ambient which translates into approximately a 70C junction.  Can it be inferred that a part that passes a higher temperature grade have fewer silicon (process) defects and potentially higher reliability?  That was along the lines that I was thinking.

 

What you are saying is that the only reason for purchasing I grade verses C grade parts is purely for the temperature range benefit and does not infer any additional reliability advantage?

 

Regards,

Nathan

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Scholar austin
Scholar
5,353 Views
Registered: ‎02-27-2008

Re: Xilinx FPGA Commercial vs. Industrial Reliability?

Nathan,

Yes.

A part that passes a higher temperature range test is sold as a I part, unless there are no orders for them, in which case it is sold as a C part. The same is true for the fastest speed grade (it gets sold first).

The part you get, meets the markings (if marked C, it meets those specifications, or exceeds them).

Implying that a higher temp part is more reliable is pure nonsense: while true that latent defects manifest as failures, causing latent failures to appear early is more to an art form than a science. Every company has their methods to improve their quality (which they keep as trade secrets).
Austin Lesea
Principal Engineer
Xilinx San Jose
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Observer vinaykattela
Observer
816 Views
Registered: ‎08-08-2018

Re: Xilinx FPGA Commercial vs. Industrial Reliability?

Quick question on the programming file: will the bit file used for commercial part be used into industrial version of FPGA?? I mean is it compatible or do we need to recompile for the industrial version? 

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807 Views
Registered: ‎09-17-2018

Re: Xilinx FPGA Commercial vs. Industrial Reliability?

n,

It is all the same silicon, same die, same design.

The operating temperature determines the lifetime.  The markings tell you what the speeds will be at the extremes of commercial, industrial, auto, military.  The software must know the grade, or all bets are off (design may not meet timing).  Do not put a different speed grade bitstream in a part that does not match (Xilinx will just say "don't do that").

So, now that you know your application can use the commercial part, you may use that device after you get a bitstream to match the commercial device's guaranteed speed grade.

So, the commercial part lasts 20+ years, industrial ~15+, auto, military ~7+ years (rough estimates of my own).  Operating well below the top end specified means lifetime is even longer typically.  For example, in telecomm systems, with worst case operating environment of 40 C, junctions might get to 80 C, and they last for more than 20 years (my own personal experience).  In fact,, I never saw the wear out end of the bathtub curve -- systems became obsolete and were replaced before then.

 

 

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