UPGRADE YOUR BROWSER

We have detected your current browser version is not the latest one. Xilinx.com uses the latest web technologies to bring you the best online experience possible. Please upgrade to a Xilinx.com supported browser:Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer 11, Safari. Thank you!

cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
368 Views
Registered: ‎10-28-2019

implementation

Jump to solution

hello 

it's my first time using FPGA, i want just to know, all the externe circuit that i must put with the fpga to make the supply( horloge, quartz...)

best regards,

0 Kudos
1 Solution

Accepted Solutions
Scholar u4223374
Scholar
344 Views
Registered: ‎04-26-2015

Re: implementation

Jump to solution

For a typical FPGA, the minimum external circuitry is:

- Power supplies. Most FPGAs will use at least two different voltages (core and I/O), and depending on what I/O you want to use you might end up with 5+ voltages. Each has very tight tolerances, and most can draw substantial current - 20A+ is not uncommon.

- Passive power supply components. An FPGA will normally be surrounded by decoupling capacitors.

- An oscillator. Most boards include a 50MHz - 100MHz oscillator, which you can multiply/divide inside the FPGA. I may be wrong, but I don't think modern FPGAs include the circuitry to directly drive a crystal (like a microcontroller would).

- Configuration memory. FPGAs (with a few exceptions) lose everything when you turn them off, so they need a bit of flash memory that they can load their configuration from. Depending on your system, you may opt to remove the flash memory and have a microcontroller program the FPGA directly. Or, with the Zynq chips, you can use an SD card as the initialization memory.

View solution in original post

0 Kudos
3 Replies
Scholar u4223374
Scholar
345 Views
Registered: ‎04-26-2015

Re: implementation

Jump to solution

For a typical FPGA, the minimum external circuitry is:

- Power supplies. Most FPGAs will use at least two different voltages (core and I/O), and depending on what I/O you want to use you might end up with 5+ voltages. Each has very tight tolerances, and most can draw substantial current - 20A+ is not uncommon.

- Passive power supply components. An FPGA will normally be surrounded by decoupling capacitors.

- An oscillator. Most boards include a 50MHz - 100MHz oscillator, which you can multiply/divide inside the FPGA. I may be wrong, but I don't think modern FPGAs include the circuitry to directly drive a crystal (like a microcontroller would).

- Configuration memory. FPGAs (with a few exceptions) lose everything when you turn them off, so they need a bit of flash memory that they can load their configuration from. Depending on your system, you may opt to remove the flash memory and have a microcontroller program the FPGA directly. Or, with the Zynq chips, you can use an SD card as the initialization memory.

View solution in original post

0 Kudos
336 Views
Registered: ‎10-28-2019

Re: implementation

Jump to solution
thank you,
I didn't get the third point
me I want to use a FPGA with System frequency up to 100 MHz, so how can I devided this frequency with a oscillator
0 Kudos
Scholar u4223374
Scholar
290 Views
Registered: ‎04-26-2015

Re: implementation

Jump to solution

abbassioussama1949@gmail.com Have a look through the Xilinx 7 series clocking resources user guide. The Xilinx Clock Management Tiles can multiply or divide an input clock to give a lot of flexibility in the output clock speed. The result of this is that you don't have to choose your input clock very carefully; from a 50MHz or 100MHz input clock you can generate almost any clock frequency you want.

0 Kudos