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Mentor
Mentor
1,156 Views
Registered: ‎10-07-2011

Non-Xilinx Transceiver

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Hi folks,

 

I have a system consisting of 2 boxes (the head and the body) linked by a cable. The head is doing nothing else than acquiring a lot of data and transmitting to the body (that is, RAW unprocessed data).

 

The body contains an FPGA that can implement high-speed serial protocols (SDI, Aurora, ...). But on the head side, I'd like to avoid the FPGA as all I need is a simple state machine (a Cool-Runner would do it). But I also need the serial transceiver.

 

Is anybody aware of transceiver ICs that could easily be interfaced to the Xilinx GTs? Any reference design, app notes, white papers?

 

Cheers all!

 

Claude

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Highlighted
1,428 Views
Registered: ‎01-08-2012

I used to design in "standalone" transceiver ICs up to about a decade ago.  Since then, these parts have become quite hard to obtain because there's no market for them; the cheapest configurable transceivers are now the ones in FPGAs (although not necessarily in devices from Xilinx).

 

I assume you have a transfer rate of a few Gb/s and you are looking at standalone transceivers because you are interested in minimising part costs, rather than something more exotic such as radiation tolerance.

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Xilinx Employee
Xilinx Employee
1,132 Views
Registered: ‎11-29-2007

at TX side you can use anything that is capable to transmit a serial data

  • at a datarate that is compatible with the RX HSSIO (please see the transceiver datasheet)
  • with low enough jitter, compatible with RX jitter tolerance (please check the Characterization Report)
  • with electrical characteristics compatible with RX side (please see the Datasheet)

For example, an LVDS transmitting at 800Mbps, with low jitter and with series decoupling capacitors could work.

 

Highlighted
1,429 Views
Registered: ‎01-08-2012

I used to design in "standalone" transceiver ICs up to about a decade ago.  Since then, these parts have become quite hard to obtain because there's no market for them; the cheapest configurable transceivers are now the ones in FPGAs (although not necessarily in devices from Xilinx).

 

I assume you have a transfer rate of a few Gb/s and you are looking at standalone transceivers because you are interested in minimising part costs, rather than something more exotic such as radiation tolerance.

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Mentor
Mentor
1,105 Views
Registered: ‎10-07-2011

Hello Allan,

 

You're right. In the short term, I need sustained ~2Gb/s. No need for any fancy specification such as rad tol. Just targetting industrial applications.

 

This is for video & imaging stuff. Eventually, as the type of detector we use go larger (more pixels) and faster, we will need more and more throughput. So I'm looking for a solution that can scale-up.

 

Thanks for your comment about the old hard-to-procure standalone transceivers. These are probably what I was hoping for. I was hoping to avoid the board-level complexity needed just to power-up the FPGA... As I was saying, a CoolRunner (ie a ridiculously small FPGA) with transceivers would do it...

 

So, it looks like I'll have to give more thought about a true FPGA solution. Probably end-up with more functionnalities embedded into that FPGA.

 

Thanks again!

 

Claude

 

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1,084 Views
Registered: ‎01-08-2012

It sounds like an interesting project.

 

Other things to consider:

 

I can see small FPGAs with 3Gb/s transceivers for less than US$20 (in small quantities) on e.g. Digikey.  You should be able to get this down to less than US$10 each in production quantity (not from e.g. Digikey).  They're from "Company L" so I won't go into more details on a Xilinx forum.

 

I'm not sure how far it is between your head end and your base station.  You will have to choose either coax (with baluns at each end - make sure you check the frequency response) or twisted pair to connect the transceivers.  Coax will work much better for longer runs, but will be more expensive.  You may also need a common mode choke for each pair.

 

[I've done this in the past ... ]  It's also possible to put everything (DC Power, high speed transceiver, O&M) all on the same coax cable using different frequency bands with passive diplexers (i.e. filters) to separate the different signals.  In this case, it can be helpful to choose a line code that has a strong DC null.  (8B10B is commonly used and has a DC null, and thus should survive such filtering.)  Be very careful to avoid low frequencies saturating your pulse transformers though.

 

I'm not sure what sort of EMC issues you're expecting.  You will probably need some sort of transient protection, particularly if you allow hot plug.  There are various TVS devices designed for the protection of high speed circuits (e.g. HDMI) that would be suitable.  These do tend to limit the high frequency performance, but you don't seem to be interested in anything faster than a few Gb/s so you should be ok.

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Xilinx Employee
Xilinx Employee
1,019 Views
Registered: ‎08-07-2007

hi @chevalier

 

you can take a look Aritx-7. the smallest with 2 GTP transceivers and 12,800 Logic Cells.

 

https://www.xilinx.com/products/silicon-devices/fpga/artix-7.html#productTable

 

Thanks,

Boris

 

 

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