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Explorer
Explorer
6,283 Views
Registered: ‎03-13-2012

difference between behavioural, post-translate,Post map simulation

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Hello every one,

 

how to we differentiate between behavioural, post-translate,Post map and Post-route simulation

 

Which one is called perfect timing simulation among the later 3...

 

I performed behavioural and post-route for my 'dynamic timing analysis'. Is it to be called the Timing simulation....!

 

Regards,

Shan

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1 Solution

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Historian
Historian
7,901 Views
Registered: ‎02-25-2008

Re: difference between behavioural, post-translate,Post map simulation

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@sraza wrote:

Hello every one,

 

how to we differentiate between behavioural, post-translate,Post map and Post-route simulation

 

Which one is called perfect timing simulation among the later 3...

 

I performed behavioural and post-route for my 'dynamic timing analysis'. Is it to be called the Timing simulation....!

 

Regards,

Shan


Behavioral (or functional) simulation doesn't include timing information, because from the logic-design perspective, it doesn't matter. If this simulation shows problems, there is no reason to attempt place and route because if the logic is wrong, then the design doesn't work. This is the most important simulation and should be as comprehensive as possible, using models of external hardware.

 

Post-route simulation uses back-annotated timing information that is exact for the design. This can be useful if your external models include timing information and you want to ensure that you meet input set-up and hold times on your inputs. This is generally what's referred to as the "timing simulation."

 

The other intermediate simulations are wholly uninteresting, unless you suspect that the synthesis tool is doing something wrong (which it's not, it's your code that's not correct).

 

Now, having said that, in general there's no need to run a timing simulation, because your timing constraints should cover things like clock period, input setup and hold  and output clock-to-out delay (OFFSET IN, OFFSET OUT) and all of that. So you do the comprehensive functional simulation to verify the design is logically correct, and then the static timing analyzer tells you that you meet the timing requirements.

 

 

----------------------------Yes, I do this for a living.
3 Replies
Historian
Historian
7,902 Views
Registered: ‎02-25-2008

Re: difference between behavioural, post-translate,Post map simulation

Jump to solution

@sraza wrote:

Hello every one,

 

how to we differentiate between behavioural, post-translate,Post map and Post-route simulation

 

Which one is called perfect timing simulation among the later 3...

 

I performed behavioural and post-route for my 'dynamic timing analysis'. Is it to be called the Timing simulation....!

 

Regards,

Shan


Behavioral (or functional) simulation doesn't include timing information, because from the logic-design perspective, it doesn't matter. If this simulation shows problems, there is no reason to attempt place and route because if the logic is wrong, then the design doesn't work. This is the most important simulation and should be as comprehensive as possible, using models of external hardware.

 

Post-route simulation uses back-annotated timing information that is exact for the design. This can be useful if your external models include timing information and you want to ensure that you meet input set-up and hold times on your inputs. This is generally what's referred to as the "timing simulation."

 

The other intermediate simulations are wholly uninteresting, unless you suspect that the synthesis tool is doing something wrong (which it's not, it's your code that's not correct).

 

Now, having said that, in general there's no need to run a timing simulation, because your timing constraints should cover things like clock period, input setup and hold  and output clock-to-out delay (OFFSET IN, OFFSET OUT) and all of that. So you do the comprehensive functional simulation to verify the design is logically correct, and then the static timing analyzer tells you that you meet the timing requirements.

 

 

----------------------------Yes, I do this for a living.
Explorer
Explorer
5,410 Views
Registered: ‎12-22-2010

Re: difference between behavioural, post-translate,Post map simulation

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here
http://forums.xilinx.com/t5/Simulation-and-Verification/many-simulation-available/m-p/323527#M7045

 

any xilinx documentation will be better !!! and which simulation called timing simulation??

 

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Teacher muzaffer
Teacher
5,399 Views
Registered: ‎03-31-2012

Re: difference between behavioural, post-translate,Post map simulation

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Behavioral is simulation of your own RTL. Personally I don't ever do post-map simulation as it is almost as expensive as post-route but doesn't have the same finality. Post route simulation is as close to real hardware as you can get. A correctly annotated post route simulation is what is called the dynamic timing analysis or timing simulation run.
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