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Explorer
Explorer
6,779 Views
Registered: ‎04-11-2010

heat sink spartan6

I am looking for a heat sink for spartan6 LX45 FGG484-2 fpga with 1mm spacing between pins.

 

Would really appreciate if some one can help.

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6 Replies
Scholar drjohnsmith
Scholar
6,777 Views
Registered: ‎07-09-2009

Re: heat sink spartan6

have you tried your local retailer ?

 

RS components, digikey etc.

 

do you know how much power you need to get rid off ?

    how much air flow do you have ?

 

 

<== If this was helpful, please feel free to give Kudos, and close if it answers your question ==>
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Instructor
Instructor
6,767 Views
Registered: ‎08-14-2007

Re: heat sink spartan6

Almost as important as the heatsink itself is the method to attach it to the chip.

These people have some interesting clip attachments if you need to apply a standard heatsink

on an existing board with no special holes for a heatsink frame.  Your other alternative

is heatsinks with pre-applied glue (these have not worked well for us) and bonding the

non-glued heatsink using two-part epoxy (we use this solution in high volume).

 

-- Gabor

-- Gabor
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Observer rho88
Observer
6,743 Views
Registered: ‎06-22-2011

Re: heat sink spartan6

We've used Radian Heatsinks before for some Virtex parts and had pretty good success.  You might want to check them out

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Teacher eteam00
Teacher
6,738 Views
Registered: ‎07-21-2009

FPGA cooling solutions

Some important questions:

 

  • Are you seeking a volume production solution, or a solution for a few boards?
  • Is this a new board design, or a retrofit to an existing board?
  • How much forced airflow is in your enclosure?

Your inquiry was lacking all of these important details, so I'll try to cover most of the likely possibilities.

 

If you need a production solution, the manufacturers are mostly in the Far East, and you should contact them through local sales reps and parts distributors (unless you happen to work in the Far East, yourself!).  If your annual volume is in the 1000s, many manufacturers will custom design a solution to meet your specifications.  They have a large catalogue of components (fans, heatsinks, pegs, springs, clips, etc.) which they can assemble into very economical assemblies.

 

If you are retrofitting a few boards, you might do some shopping on eBay.  The two high-volume (and relatively cheap) solutions are CPU coolers (for Intel and AMD processors) which handle 10s of watts, and video ("VGA") chipset coolers which handle up to 10W.  The CPU coolers are entirely inappropriate for FPGAs in most applications, of course.  The video coolers are quite effective and inexpensive.

 

Does your enclosure have forced air movement?  If so, a passive (no fan) heatsink may be completely adequate, and you eliminate the reliability risk of a cheap fan with cheap bearings.

 

If there is no forced air in your enclosure, and you are relying on natural convection for cooling, a passive heatsink adequate for your thermal requirements may be physically huge.  Passive heatsinks are not very efficient for heat transfer in still air.  On the other hand, it doesn't take much air movement to greatly increase the thermal transfer efficiency of a heatsink.  The addition of a cute little fan is usually enough to shrink a monstrous heatsink to the size of...  a video board cooler.

 

If you decide that an active cooler (heatsink plus fan) is the best tradeoff for your needs, you have another choice to make:

  • select a high-quality fan with long-life (more expensive) bearings (typically ball bearings)
  • select a cheaper fan with inexpensive (shorter service life) bearings (typically sleeve bearings)

Your selection may depend on the required lifespan of your product.

 

In a recent design for a volume production consumer product,  I selected a middle-grade fan, and I added a thermostat circuit for turning on (or off) the fan.  Because this product (a laser printer) is idling almost all the time, a thermal control extended the operational lifespan of the fan by several orders of magnitude.  An inexpensive FET is all you need for switching the fan power.  Add some hysteresis (e.g. 30 sec delay for switching off)  to avoid constantly switching the fan on and off.

 

If you select a cooler with a heatsink, the manufacturer will provide you with datasheets listing 'operating hours lifespan' for each of the various fans.  The lifespan claims are typically ridiculously unbelieveable.  A 50-cent fan with sleeve bearings is not going to have a 50,000 hour operating lifespan.

 

If this is for a new board design, you have the option of selecting from a number of attachment mechanisms.  Spring-loaded nylon pegs and metal clips are both quite popular.  You should obtain mechanical samples of your preferred solution before completing your circuit board design.  If you choose nylon pegs, evaluate the circuit board drill size and tolerance carefully.  If the holes are too small, the production folks will not be happy trying to attach the device.  If the holes are too large, the thing will fall off in shipment and rattle around your circuit board until the customer unpacks the thing (hopefully without first powering on the board!).

 

-- Bob Elkind

SIGNATURE:
README for newbies is here: http://forums.xilinx.com/t5/New-Users-Forum/README-first-Help-for-new-users/td-p/219369

Summary:
1. Read the manual or user guide. Have you read the manual? Can you find the manual?
2. Search the forums (and search the web) for similar topics.
3. Do not post the same question on multiple forums.
4. Do not post a new topic or question on someone else's thread, start a new thread!
5. Students: Copying code is not the same as learning to design.
6 "It does not work" is not a question which can be answered. Provide useful details (with webpage, datasheet links, please).
7. You are not charged extra fees for comments in your code.
8. I am not paid for forum posts. If I write a good post, then I have been good for nothing.
Instructor
Instructor
6,725 Views
Registered: ‎08-14-2007

Re: FPGA cooling solutions

 

If you select a cooler with a heatsink, the manufacturer will provide you with datasheets listing 'operating hours lifespan' for each of the various fans.  The lifespan claims are typically ridiculously unbelieveable.  A 50-cent fan with sleeve bearings is not going to have a 50,000 hour operating lifespan.

 

You probably missed the fine print where they say that the "operating" life assumes a 25% duty cycle operation

with a thermostatic control...

 

;-)

 

-- Gabor

 

-- Gabor
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Teacher eteam00
Teacher
6,723 Views
Registered: ‎07-21-2009

Re: FPGA cooling solutions

You probably missed the fine print where they say that the "operating" life assumes a 25% duty cycle operation

with a thermostatic control...

Yup, gotta get new eyeglasses...

 

-- Bob Elkind

SIGNATURE:
README for newbies is here: http://forums.xilinx.com/t5/New-Users-Forum/README-first-Help-for-new-users/td-p/219369

Summary:
1. Read the manual or user guide. Have you read the manual? Can you find the manual?
2. Search the forums (and search the web) for similar topics.
3. Do not post the same question on multiple forums.
4. Do not post a new topic or question on someone else's thread, start a new thread!
5. Students: Copying code is not the same as learning to design.
6 "It does not work" is not a question which can be answered. Provide useful details (with webpage, datasheet links, please).
7. You are not charged extra fees for comments in your code.
8. I am not paid for forum posts. If I write a good post, then I have been good for nothing.
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