cancel
Showing results for 
Show  only  | Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Jack Ganssle reviews the Zynq-based, $759 Siglent SDS1204X-E 200MHz, 4-channel DSO and he’s giving one away—if you hurry

Xilinx Employee
Xilinx Employee
0 0 25.5K

 

My good friend Jack Ganssle has long published The Embedded Muse email newsletter and the January 2, 2018 issue (#341!) includes an extensive review of the new $759, Zynq-based Siglent SDS1204X-E 4-channel DSO. Best of all, he’s giving one of these bad boys away at the end of January. (Contest details below.)

 

 

Siglent SDS-1204X-E.jpg 

 

Siglent’s Zynq-based SDS1204X-E 4-channel DSO. Photo credit: Jack Ganssle

 

 

 

The Siglent SDS1204X-E is the 4-channel version of the Siglent SDS1202X-E that EEVblog’s Dave Jones tore down last April. (See “Dave Jones tears down the new, <$400, Zynq-powered, Siglent SDS1202X-E 2-channel, 200MHz, 1Gsamples/sec DSO.”) I personally bought one of those scopes and I can attest to it’s being one sweet instrument. You should read Jack’s detailed review on his Web site, but here’s his summary:

 

“I'm blown away by the advanced engineering and quality of manufacturing exhibited by this and some other Chinese test equipment. Steve Leibson wrote a piece about how the unit works, and it's clear that the innovation and technology in this unit are world-class.”

 

 

In my own review of the Siglent SDS1202X-E last November, I wrote:

 

 

“Siglent’s SDS-1202X-E and SDS-1104X-E DSOs once again highlight the Zynq SoC’s flexibility and capability when used as the foundation for a product family. The Zynq SoC’s unique combination of a dual-core Arm Cortex-A9 MPCore processing subsystem and a good-sized chunk of Xilinx 7 series FPGA permits the development of truly high-performance platforms.”

 

Last April, I wrote:

 

“The new SDS1000X-E DSO family illustrates the result of selecting a Zynq SoC as the foundation for a system design. The large number of on-chip resources permit you to think outside of the box when it comes to adding features. Once you’ve selected a Zynq SoC, you no longer need to think about cramming code into the device to add features. With the Zynq SoC’s hardware, software, and I/O programmability, you can instead start thinking up new features that significantly improve the product’s competitive position in your market.

 

“This is precisely what Siglent’s engineers were able to do. Once the Zynq SoC was included in the design, the designers of this entry-level DSO family were able to think about which high-performance features they wished to migrate to their new design.”

 

 

 

All of that is equally true for the Siglent SDS1204X-E 4-channel DSO, which is further proof of just how good the Zynq SoC is when used as a foundation for an entire product-family.

 

Now if you want to win the Siglent SDS1204X-E 4-channel DSO that Jack’s giving away at the end of January, you first need to subscribe to The Embedded Muse. The subscription is free, Jack’s an outstanding engineer and a wonderful writer, and he’s not going to sell or even give your email address to anyone else so consider the Embedded Muse subscription a bonus for entering the drawing. After you subscribe, you can enter the contest here. (Note: It’s Jack’s contest, so if you have questions, you need to ask him.)

 

Tags (2)