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Linc the autonomous Lincoln MKZ running Perrone Robotics' MAX AI takes a drive in Detroit without puny humans’ help

by Xilinx Employee ‎06-12-2017 10:39 AM - edited ‎06-13-2017 06:08 AM (45,395 Views)

 

Linc, Perrone Robotics’ autonomous Lincoln MKZ automobile, took a drive around the Perrone paddock at the TU Automotive autonomous vehicle show in Detroit last week and Dan Isaacs, Xilinx’s Director Connected Systems in Corporate Marketing, was there to shoot photos and video. Perrone’s Linc test vehicle operates autonomously using the company’s MAX (Mobile Autonomous X), a “comprehensive full-stack, modular, real-time capable, customizable, robotics software platform for autonomous (self-driving) vehicles and general purpose robotics.” MAX runs on multiple computing platforms including one based on an Iveia controller, which is based on an Iveia Atlas SOM, which in turn is based on a Xilinx Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC. The Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC handles the avalanche of data streaming from the vehicle’s many sensors to ensure that the car travels the appropriate path and avoids hitting things like people, walls and fences, and other vehicles. That’s all pretty important when the car is driving itself in public. (For more information about Perrone Robotics’ MAX, see “Perrone Robotics builds [Self-Driving] Hot Rod Lincoln with its MAX platform, on a Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC.”)

 

Here’s a photo of Perrone’s sensored-up Linc autonomous automobile in the Perrone Robotics paddock at TU Automotive in Detroit:

 

 

Perrone Robotics Linc Autonomous Driving Lincoln MKZ.jpg 

 

 

And here’s a photo of the Iveia control box with the Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC inside, running Perrone’s MAX autonomous-driving software platform. (Note the controller’s small size and lack of a cooling fan):

 

 

Iveia Autonomous Driving Controller for Perrone Robotics.jpg 

 

 

Opinions about the feasibility of autonomous vehicles are one thing. Seeing the Lincoln MKZ’s 3800 pounds of glass, steel, rubber, and plastic being controlled entirely by a little silver box in the trunk, that’s something entirely different. So here’s the video that shows Perrone Robotics’ Linc in action, driving around the relative safety of the paddock while avoiding the fences, pedestrians, and other vehicles: