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13 MEMS microphones plus a Zynq SoC gives services like Amazon’s Alexa and Google Home far-field voice recognition clarity

by Xilinx Employee ‎10-03-2017 04:18 PM - edited ‎10-05-2017 09:16 AM (27,093 Views)

 

Voice-controlled systems are suddenly a thing thanks to Amazon’s Alexa and Google Home. But how do you get reliable, far-field voice recognition and robust voice recognition in the presence of noise? That’s the question being answered by Aaware with its $199 Far-Field Development Platform. This system couples as many as 13 MEMS microphones (you can use fewer in a 1D linear or 2D array) with a Xilinx Zynq Z-7010 SoC to pre-filter incoming voice, delivering a clean voice data stream to local or cloud-based voice recognition hardware. The system has a built-in wake word (like “Alexa” or “OK, Google”) that triggers the unit’s filtering algorithms.

 

Here’s a video showing you the Aaware Far-Field Development Platform in action:

 

 

 

 

 

  

Aaware’s technology makes significant use of the Zynq Z-7010 SoC’s programmable-logic and DSP processing capabilities to implement and accelerate the company’s sound-capture technologies including:

 

 

  • Noise and echo cancellation
  • Source detection and localization

 

 

You’ll find more technology details for the Aaware Far-Field Development Platform here.

 

 

Please contact Aaware directly for more information.

 

 

 

 

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About the Author
  • Be sure to join the Xilinx LinkedIn group to get an update for every new Xcell Daily post! ******************** Steve Leibson is the Director of Strategic Marketing and Business Planning at Xilinx. He started as a system design engineer at HP in the early days of desktop computing, then switched to EDA at Cadnetix, and subsequently became a technical editor for EDN Magazine. He's served as Editor in Chief of EDN Magazine, Embedded Developers Journal, and Microprocessor Report. He has extensive experience in computing, microprocessors, microcontrollers, embedded systems design, design IP, EDA, and programmable logic.