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Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 170: UltraZed Edition Part 2

by Xilinx Employee on ‎02-08-2017 01:58 PM (16,888 Views)

 

By Adam Taylor

 

Having introduced the Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC last week, this week it is time to look at the Avnet UltraZed-EG SOM and its carrier card and to start building our first “hello world” program.

 

Like is MicroZed and PicoZed predecessors, the UltraZed-EG is a System on Module (SOM) that contains all of the necessary support functions for a complete embedded processing system. As a SOM, this module is designed to be integrated with an application-specific carrier card. In this instance, our application-specific card is the Avnet UltraZed IO Carrier Card.

 

The specific Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC contained within the UltraZed SOM is the XCZU3EG-SFVA625, which incorporates a quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 APU (Application Processing Unit), dual ARM Cortex-R5 processors in an RPU (Real-Time Processing Unit), and an ARM Mali-400 GPU. Coupled with a very high performance programmable-logic array based on the Xilinx UltraScale+ FPGA fabric, suffice it to say that exploring how to best use all of these resources it will keep us very, very busy. You can find the 36-page product specification for the device here.

 

The UltraZed SOM itself shown in the diagram below provides us with 2GBytes of DDR4 SDRAM, while non-volatile storage for our application(s) is provided by both dual QSPI or eMMC Flash memory. Most of the Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC’s PS and PL I/O are broken out to one of three headers to provide maximum flexibility on the application-specific carrier card.

 

 

Avnet UltraZed Block Diagram.jpg

 

 

Avnet UltraZed-EG SOM Block Diagram

 

 

 

The UltraZed IO Carrier Card (IOCC), breaks out the I/O pins from the SOM to a wide variety of interface and interconnect technologies including Gigabit Ethernet, USB 2/3, UART, PMOD, Display Port, SATA, and Ardunio Shield. This diverse set of I/O connections give us wide lattitude in developing all sorts of systems. The IOCC also provicdes a USB to JTAG interface allowing us to program and debug our system. You’ll find more information on the IOCC here.

 

Having introduced the UltraZed and its IOCC, it is time to write a simple “hello world” application and to generate our first Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC design.

 

The first step on this journey is make sure we have used the provided voucher to generate a license and downloaded the Design Edition of the Vivado Design Suite.

 

The next step is to install the board files to provide Vivado with the necessary information to create designs targeting the UltraZed SoM. You can download these files using this link. These board-definition files include information such as the actual Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC device populated on the SoM, connections to the PS on the IOCC, and a preset configuration for the SoM. We can of course create an example without using these files, however it requires a lot more work.

 

Once you have downloaded the zip file, extract the contents into the following directory:

 

 

<Vivado Install Root>/data/boards/boardfiles

 

 

When this is complete, you will see that the UltraZed board defintions are now in the directory and we can now use them within our design.

 

 

Image2.jpg 

 

 

I should point out at this point that some of the UltraZed boards (including mine) use ES1 silicon. To alert Vivado about this, we need to create a init.tcl file in the scripts directory that will enable us to use ES1 silicon. Doing so is very simple. Within the directory:

 

<Vivado root>/scripts

 

Create a file called init.tcl. Enter the line “enable_beta_device*” into this file to enable the use of ES1 silicon within your toolchain.

 

 

Image3.jpg 

 

 

 

With this completed we can open Vivado and create a new RTL project. After entering the project name and location, click next on the add sources, IP, and constraints tabs. This should bring you to part selection tab. Click on boards and you should see our UltraZed IOCC board. Select that board and then finish the open project dialog.

 

 

Image4.jpg

 

 

 

This will create a new project.

 

For this project I am just going to just use the Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC’s PS to print “hello world.” I usually like to do this with new boards to ensure that I have pipe-cleaned the tool chain. To do this, we need a hardware-definition file to export to SDK to define the hardware platform.

 

The first step in this sequence is within Flow Navigator. On the left-hand side of the Vivado screen, select the Create Block Diagram option. This will provide a dialog box allowing you to name your block design (or you can leave it default). Click OK and this will create a blank block diagram (in the example below mine is called design_1).

 

 

Image5.jpg 

 

 

 

Within this block diagram, we need to add an MPSoC system. Click on the “add IP” button as indicated in the block diagram. This will bring up an IP dialog. Within the search box, type in “MPSoC” and you will see the Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC IP block. Double click on this and it will be added to the diagram automatically.

 

 

Image6.jpg

 

 

 

Once the block has been added, you will notice a designer assistance notification across the top of the block diagram. For the moment, do not click on that. Instead, double click on the MPSoC IP in your block diagram and it will open up the customization screen for the MPSoC, just like any other IP block.

 

 

Image7.jpg

 

 

 

Looking at the customization screen, you will see it is not yet configured for the target board. For instance, the IOU block has no MIO configuration. Had we not downloaded the board definition, we would now have to configure this by manually. But why do that when we can use the shortcut?

 

Image8.jpg 

 

 

We have the board-definition files, so all we need to do to correctly configure this for the IOCC is close the customization dialog and click on the Run Block Automation notification at the top of the block diagram. This will configure the MPSoC for our use on the IOCC. Within the block automation dialog, check to make sure that the “apply pre-sets” option is selected before clicking OK.

 

 

Image9.jpg 

 

 

Re-open the MPSoC IP block again and you will see a different configuration of the MPSoC—one that is ready to use with our IOCC.

 

 

Image10.jpg

 

 

Do not change anything. Close the dialog box. Then, on the block diagram, connect the PL_CLK0 pin to the maxihpm0_lpd_ack pin. Once that is complete, click on “validate” to ensure that the design has no errors.

 

 

Image11.jpg 

 

 

 

The next step is very simple. We’ll create an RTL wrapper file for the block diagram. This will allow us to implement the design. Under the sources tab, right-click on the block diagram and select “create HDL wrapper.” When prompted, select the option that allows Vivado to manage the file for you and click OK.

 

 

Image12.jpg

 

 

 

To generate the bitstream, click on the “Generate Bitstream” icon on the menu bar. If you are prompted about any stages being out of date, re-run them first by clicking on “yes.”

 

 

Image13.jpg

 

 

 

Depending on the speed of your system, this step may take a few minutes or longer to generate the bitstream. Once completed, select the “open implementation” option. Having the implementation open allows us to export the hardware definition file to SDK where we will develop our software.

 

 

Image14.jpg

 

 

 

To export the hardware definition, select File-> Export->Export Hardware. Select “include bit file” and export it.

 

 

Image15.jpg

 

 

 

To those familiar with the original Zynq SoC, all of this should look pretty familiar.

 

We are now ready to write our first software program—next time.

 

 

You can find links to previous editions of the MPSoC edition here

 

 

 

Code is available on Github as always.

 

If you want E book or hardback versions of previous MicroZed chronicle blogs, you can get them below.

 

 

 

  • First Year E Book here
  • First Year Hardback here.

 

 

MicroZed Chronicles hardcopy.jpg 

 

 

 

  • Second Year E Book here
  • Second Year Hardback here

 

 

 MicroZed Chronicles Second Year.jpg

 

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About the Author
  • Be sure to join the Xilinx LinkedIn group to get an update for every new Xcell Daily post! ******************** Steve Leibson is the Director of Strategic Marketing and Business Planning at Xilinx. He started as a system design engineer at HP in the early days of desktop computing, then switched to EDA at Cadnetix, and subsequently became a technical editor for EDN Magazine. He's served as Editor in Chief of EDN Magazine, Embedded Developers Journal, and Microprocessor Report. He has extensive experience in computing, microprocessors, microcontrollers, embedded systems design, design IP, EDA, and programmable logic.