UPGRADE YOUR BROWSER

We have detected your current browser version is not the latest one. Xilinx.com uses the latest web technologies to bring you the best online experience possible. Please upgrade to a Xilinx.com supported browser:Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer 11, Safari. Thank you!

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles, Part 184: TySOM Deep Dive and Zynq Face Detection Part 2

by Xilinx Employee on ‎04-10-2017 10:54 AM (15,832 Views)

 

By Adam Taylor

 

 

Having introduced the Aldec TySOM-2 FPGA Prototyping Board, based on the Xilinx Zynq SoC, and the face detection application running on it, I thought it would be a good idea to take a more detailed examination of the face-detection application’s architecture.

 

The face detection example uses one Blue Eagle camera, which is connected to the Aldec FMC-ADAS card. The processed frames showing the detected face are output via the TySOM-2 board’s HDMI port. What is worth pointing out is that the application running on the TySOM-2 board, face detection in this case, is enabled by the software. The Zynq PL (programmable logic) hardware design provides the capability to interface with the camera, for sharing the video frames with the Zynq PS (processing system) through the DDR SDRAM, and for display output.

 

Any application could be implemented—not just face detection. It could be object tracking. I could be corner detection. It could be anything. This is one of the things that makes development of image-processing systems on the Zynq so powerful. We can use the same base platform on the TySOM-2 board and customize the application in software. Of course, we can also use the Xilinx SDSoC development environment to further accelerate the algorithm into the TySOM-2 platform’s remaining resources to increase performance.

 

The Blue Eagle camera transmits the video stream using a, FPD-Link III link. These links use a high-speed, bi-directional CML (Current Mode Logic) link to transfer the image data. An FPD-Link III receiving device (a TI DS90UB914Q-Q1 FPD-Link III SER/DES) is used on the ADAS FMC to implement this camera interface. This device is configured for the application in hand using the I2C peripheral in the Zynq SoC’s PS. This device provides video to the Zynq PL in a parallel format: the parallel data bits, HSync, VSync, and a pixel clock.

 

 

Image1.jpg 

 

 

We need to process the frames and store them within the Zynq PS’ DDR SDRAM using Video DMA (Direct Memory Access) to ensure that we can access the image frames within DDR memory using the Zynq SoC’s ARM Cortex-A9 processor. We need to use several IP blocks that come as standard IP within Vivado to implement this. These IP blocks transfer data using the AXI streaming protocol--AXIS.

 

Therefore, the first thing needed is to convert the received video in parallel format into an AXIS stream. Once the video is in the correct format, we can use the VDMA IP block to transfer video data to and from the Zynq PS’ DDR SDRAM, where the software running on the Zynq SoC’s ARM Cortex-A9 processors can access the frames and implement the application algorithms.

 

Unlike previous examples we have examined, which used a single AXI High Performance (AXI HP) port, this example uses two of the Zynq SOC’s AXI HP interface ports, one in each direction. This configuration requires a slightly more complicated DMA architecture because we’ll need two VDMA IP Blocks. Within the Zynq PL, the AXI standard used for most IP blocks is AXI 4.0 while the ports on the Zynq SoC implement AXI 3.0. Therefore, we need to use an AXI Interconnect or a protocol convertor to convert between the two standards.

 

 

Image2.jpg

 

 

 

This use of two interfaces will make no performance difference when compared to a single HP AXI interface because the S0 and S1 AXI HP Ports on the Zynq SoC which are used by this configuration are multiplexed down to the M0 port on the memory interconnect and finally connected to the S3 port on the DDR SDRAM controller. This is shown below in the interconnection diagram from UG585, the TRM for the Zynq SoC.

 

 

 

Image3.jpg 

 

 

Once the VDMA is implemented, the design then perform color-space conversion, chroma resampling, and finally passes to an on-screen display module. Once this has been completed, the video stream must be converted from AXIS to parallel video, which can then be output to the HDMI transmitter.

 

With this hardware platform completed, the next step is to write the software to create the application. For this we have the choice of using SDK or using SDSoC, which adds the ability to accelerate some of the application algorithm functions using programmable logic. As this example is implemented on the Zynq Z-7100 SoC, which has a significant amount of free, on-chip programmable resources following the implementation of the base platform, we’ll be using SDSoC for this example. We will look at the software architecture next time.

 

My code is available on Github as always.

 

If you want E book or hardback versions of previous MicroZed chronicle blogs, you can get them below.

 

 

 

  • First Year E Book here
  • First Year Hardback here.

 

 

MicroZed Chronicles hardcopy.jpg 

  

 

  • Second Year E Book here
  • Second Year Hardback here

 

MicroZed Chronicles Second Year.jpg 

 

Labels
About the Author
  • Be sure to join the Xilinx LinkedIn group to get an update for every new Xcell Daily post! ******************** Steve Leibson is the Director of Strategic Marketing and Business Planning at Xilinx. He started as a system design engineer at HP in the early days of desktop computing, then switched to EDA at Cadnetix, and subsequently became a technical editor for EDN Magazine. He's served as Editor in Chief of EDN Magazine, Embedded Developers Journal, and Microprocessor Report. He has extensive experience in computing, microprocessors, microcontrollers, embedded systems design, design IP, EDA, and programmable logic.