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Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 198: Building the 250Msamples/sec AD9467 FMC Card

by Xilinx Employee ‎05-30-2017 10:48 AM - edited ‎05-30-2017 10:50 AM (13,230 Views)

 

By Adam Taylor

 

 

Last week I mentioned, the Analog Devices AD9467 FMC in the blog and how we could use it with the Xilinx SDSoC development environment to capture data with a simple data-capture chain and then develop and accelerate the algorithm using a high-level language like C or C++.

 

 

Image1.jpg

 

Analog Devices AD9467 FMC and Zynq-based Avnet ZedBoard Combined

 

 

 

The AD9467 FMC contains the AD9467 ADC, which provides 16-bit quantization at sampling rates of up to 250Msamples/sec (MSPS). These specs allow us to use the AD9467 to sample Intermediate Frequency (IF) signals. An IF is used to move an RF carrier wave down from or up to a higher frequency for reception or transmission.

 

The first thing we need to do with the AD9467 board is to work out the clocking scheme we’ll use to provide the ADC with a sample clock. We have three options:

 

  1. Apply an externally generated sine-wave. This option allows us to easily change the sampling frequency. However, to ensure good convertor performance, we’ll need a low-jitter clock from a quality signal source.
  2. Use the on-board oscillator. This option provides a fixed 250MHz reference clock to the ADC. It has the advantage of being an on-board resource with a known good layout. However, its sampling frequency is fixed.
  3. Use the on-board AD9517—an SPI-controlled, 12-output clock generator. This option gives us the ability to set the sampling frequency as desired.

 

To change between the three sources, we add and remove ac coupling capacitors from the circuit to put the correct clock generator in the clock path. By default, the clock path is configured to use the external clock source.

 

However, before we can create an SDSoC Platform, we need to create a base design in Vivado. This base design interfaces with the AD9467 FMC and transfers the sampled data into the Zynq SoC’s PS (processing system) DDR memory using DMA. Rather helpfully, the AD9467 FMC comes with a Vivado example that we can use with the ZedBoard. This example design creates the structure to transfer samples into the PS DDR SDRAM using DMA.

 

To recreate this design, the first thing we need to do is download the Analog Devices Git Hub repository, which contains both the shared IP elements required and the actual Vivado design example. To ensure we are using the latest possible tool chain, select the latest tool revision from the Git Hub and download a zip of the repository or clone the repository from here.

 

To build this project, we need to be using either a Linux box or, if we are using Microsoft Windows, we’ll need to download and install CYGWIN. If you are using CYGWIN, you need to make sure you have Vivado in your path.

 

To build the project you just need to use either a terminal or CYGWIN to navigate to the AD9467_FMC directory and execute the make file for the Zed version.

 

 

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Make file running in CYGWIN to recreate the project

 

 

 

Once this has been recreated, we will be able to open our project in Vivado, explore the design in the block diagram, and export the design. We can then use the test application software to complete the demo.

 

 

 

Image3.jpg 

 

AD9467 FMC example design

 

 

 

As can be seen in the above example, these steps add the FMC example into the existing Zynq base hardware design so that all the other interfaces like HDMI are still available. These additional interfaces can be very useful to us. In the diagram above, you can see the highlighted path from the AD9467 receiver IP, into a DMA IP block and then an AXI Interconnect block that connects to a Zynq HP (high-performance) AXI port. This design allows the data move seamless into the PS DDR SDRAM for future processing.

 

Of course to do this we need to run some software on the Zynq SoC’s ARM Cortex-A9 processor to configure the AD9467, the AD9517, and the simple internal processing pipeline. You can download the demo application example from here on GitHub. Helpfully, it comes with batch files (one for Linux one for Windows), which are used to create the demo software application to support the Vivado design.

 

When we run this example on the Zynq SoC, we will find that it performs a number of tests prior to performing the first ADC sample capture.

 

 

 

Image4.jpg 

 

Terminal Output from ZedBoard if the FMC is present

 

 

 

The samples will be stored at 0x0800_0000 within the DDR SDRAM. Using the debug facility within SDK, we can examine these values and see that they are updated when the sampling occurs.

 

 

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DDR Memory location at 0x0800_0000 following power cycle

 

 

 

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DDR Memory Location at 0x0800_0000 following the samples being captured

 

 

 

With this up and working, we can now think about how we can use the base platform efficiently to implement higher-level signal-processing algorithms.

 

 

 

Code is available on Github as always.

 

If you want E book or hardback versions of previous MicroZed chronicle blogs, you can get them below.

 

 

 

  • First Year E Book here
  • First Year Hardback here.

 

 

MicroZed Chronicles hardcopy.jpg 

  

 

  • Second Year E Book here
  • Second Year Hardback here

 

 

MicroZed Chronicles Second Year.jpg

 

 

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About the Author
  • Be sure to join the Xilinx LinkedIn group to get an update for every new Xcell Daily post! ******************** Steve Leibson is the Director of Strategic Marketing and Business Planning at Xilinx. He started as a system design engineer at HP in the early days of desktop computing, then switched to EDA at Cadnetix, and subsequently became a technical editor for EDN Magazine. He's served as Editor in Chief of EDN Magazine, Embedded Developers Journal, and Microprocessor Report. He has extensive experience in computing, microprocessors, microcontrollers, embedded systems design, design IP, EDA, and programmable logic.