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Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 29: The MicroZed I/O Carrier Card

by Xilinx Employee on ‎04-28-2014 09:18 AM (14,774 Views)

I recently took delivery of a MicroZed I/O Carrier Card, which complements the MicroZed System on Module (SOM) approach by breaking out the numerous I/O ports on the MicroZed board’s two micro connector headers.

 

 

Figure 1.jpg

 

The compact size of the MicroZed

 

 

The concept behind the MicroZed is that that it allows you to create a system of modules where the same compact MicroZed board can plug into a variety of application-specific carrier cards. When you stop and think about it this approach has a number of benefits:

 

  • Reduces Non-Recurring Effort in the development of the product, allowing focus to remain on areas of added value (e.g. an application-specific carrier card, which is simpler and easier to design).
  • Use of the MicroZed SOM board as a core provides a rapid-development hardware platform that allows the development team to begin very early testing of designs based on the Zynq SoC.
  • There’s no need to design a custom SoC and perform the subsequent verification, which greatly reduces time to market.
  • Allows the hardware design effort to be targeted at the application-specific card carrier, which reduces risk.

 

The MicroZed SOM concept is very flexible because the core MicroZed board breaks out just not the I/O from the programmable logic (PL) side of the Zynq SoC but also from the processor system (PS) side. One really interesting aspect is that the Zynq SoC’s I/O bank voltages are also accessible from the micro-connector headers on the MicroZed board and can therefore be driven by an external card. This enables a carrier card to set the Zynq’s I/O voltages for banks 34, 35 and 13 if you are using the Zynq Z7020 version of the MicroZed. The I/O Carrier Card supplies the I/O voltages required for the application at hand.

 

 

 Figure 2.jpg

 

The MicroZed is installed on the left side of the I/I Carrier Card

 

 

The MicroZed board is also designed so that the board’s 5V power can be supplied from either the USB port or via the carrier card. This is achieved by diode-OR’ing the power supply lines from the MicroZed’s USB port and from the micro header on the MicroZed board.

 

There are currently three off-the-shelf carrier cards which can be purchased off the shelf from Zedboard.org:

 

 

The I/O Carrier Card I will be experimenting with over the next few blogs comes with 12 PMOD (Digilent Peripheral Module) interfaces, LEDS, switches, and a 100MHZ oscillator used for clocking the PL side of the Zynq. I would like to use the I/O Carrier Card to test out a few concepts I have been demonstrating over the last few blogs. Hopefully my orders will arrive before I sit down to write the next blog.

 

 

Please see the previous entries in this MicroZed series by Adam Taylor:

 

Zynq DMA Part Two – Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 29

 

The Zynq PS/PL, Part Eight: Zynq DMA – Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 28  

 

The Zynq PS/PL, Part Seven: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 27

 

The Zynq PS/PL, Part Six: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 26

 

The Zynq PS/PL, Part Five: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 25

 

The Zynq PS/PL, Part Four: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 24

 

The Zynq PS/PL, Part Three: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 23

 

The Zynq PS/PL, Part Two: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 22

 

The Zynq PS/PL, Part One: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 21

 

Introduction to the Zynq Triple Timer Counter Part Four: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 20

 

Introduction to the Zynq Triple Timer Counter Part Three: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 19

 

Introduction to the Zynq Triple Timer Counter Part Two: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 18

 

Introduction to the Zynq Triple Timer Counter Part One: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 17

 

The Zynq SoC’s Private Watchdog: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 16

 

Implementing the Zynq SoC’s Private Timer: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 15

 

MicroZed Timers, Clocks and Watchdogs: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 14

 

More About MicroZed Interrupts: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 13

 

MicroZed Interrupts: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 12

 

Using the MicroZed Button for Input: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 11

 

Driving the Zynq SoC's GPIO: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 10

 

Meet the Zynq MIO: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 9

 

MicroZed XADC Software: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 8

 

Getting the XADC Running on the MicroZed: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 7

 

A Boot Loader for MicroZed. Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles, Part 6 

 

Figuring out the MicroZed Boot Loader – Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles, Part 5

 

Running your programs on the MicroZed – Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles, Part 4

 

Zynq and MicroZed say “Hello World”-- Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles, Part 3

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles: Setting the SW Scene

 

Bringing up the Avnet MicroZed with Vivado

 

 

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About the Author
  • Be sure to join the Xilinx LinkedIn group to get an update for every new Xcell Daily post! ******************** Steve Leibson is the Director of Strategic Marketing and Business Planning at Xilinx. He started as a system design engineer at HP in the early days of desktop computing, then switched to EDA at Cadnetix, and subsequently became a technical editor for EDN Magazine. He's served as Editor in Chief of EDN Magazine, Embedded Developers Journal, and Microprocessor Report. He has extensive experience in computing, microprocessors, microcontrollers, embedded systems design, design IP, EDA, and programmable logic.