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Jurassic computer: How to resurrect a Commodore 64/65 8-bit microcomputer from a quarter century ago with an FPGA

by Xilinx Employee ‎04-18-2017 03:10 PM - edited ‎04-19-2017 09:10 AM (4,455 Views)

 

Mega65 Logo.jpgThe MEGA65 is an open-source microcomputer modeled on the incredibly successful Commodore 64/65 circa 1982-1990. Ye olde Commodore 64 (C64)—introduced in 1982—was based on an 8-bit MOS Technology 6510 microprocessor, which was derived from the very popular 6502 processor that powered the Apple II, Atari 400/800, and many other 8-bit machines in the 1980s. The 6510 processor added an 8-bit parallel I/O port to the 6502, which no doubt dropped the microcomputer’s BOM cost a buck or two. According to Wikipedia, “The 6510 was only widely used in the Commodore 64 home computer and its variants.” Also according to Wikipedia, “For a substantial period (1983–1986), the C64 had between 30% and 40% share of the US market and two million units sold per year, outselling the IBM PC compatibles, Apple Inc. computers, and the Atari 8-bit family of computers.”

 

Now that is indeed a worthy computer to serve as a “Jurassic Park” candidate and therefore, the non-profit MEGA (Museum of Electronic Games & Art), “dedicated to the preservation of our digital heritage,” is supervising the physical recreation of the Commodore 64 microcomputer (mega65.org). It’s called the MEGA65 and it’s software-compatible with the original Commodore 64, only faster. (The 6510 processor emulation in the MEGA65 runs at 48MHz compared to the original MOS Technology 6510’s ~1MHz clock rate.) MEGA65 hardware designs and software are open-source (LGPL).

 

How do you go about recreating the hardware of a machine that’s been gone for 25 years? Fortunately, it’s a lot easier than extracting DNA from the stomach contents of ancient mosquitos trapped in amber. Considering that this blog is appearing in Xcell Daily on the Xilinx Web site, the answer’s pretty obvious: you use an FPGA. And that’s exactly what’s happening.

 

A few days ago, the MEGA65 team celebrated initial bringup of the MEGA65 pcb. You can read about the bringup efforts here and here is a photo of the pcb:

 

 

MEGA65 pcb.jpg 

 

The first MEGA65 PCB

 

 

 

The MEGA65 pcb is designed to fit into the existing Commodore 65 plastic case. (The Commodore 65 was prototyped but not put into production.)

 

Sort of gives a new meaning to “single-chip microcomputer,” does it not. That big chip in the middle of the board is an Xilinx Artix-7 A200T. It implements the Commodore 64’s entire motherboard in one programmable logic device. Yes, that includes the RAM. The Artix-7 A200T FPGA has 13.14Mbits of on-chip block RAM. That’s more than 1.5Mbytes of RAM, or 25x more RAM than the original Commodore 64 motherboard, which used eight 4164 64Kbit, 150nsec DRAMs for RAM storage. The video’s a bit improved too, from 160x200 pixels, with a maximum of four colors per 4x8 character block, or 320x200 pixels, with a maximum of two colors per 8x8 character block, to a more modern 1920x1200 pixels with 12-bit color (23-bit color is planned). Funny what 35 years of semiconductor evolution can produce.

 

What’s the project’s progress status? Here’s a snapshot from the MEGA65 site:

 

 

 

MEGA65 Progress.jpg

 

 

MEGA65 Project Status

 

 

 

And here’s a video of the MEGA65 in action:


 

 

 

 

 

Remember, what you see and hear is running on a Xilinx Artix-7 A200T, configured to emulate an entire Commodore 64 microcomputer. Most of the code in this video was written in the Jurassic period of microcomputer development. If you’re of a certain age, these old programs should bring a chuckle or perhaps just a smile to your lips.

 

 

Note: You’ll find a MEGA65 project log by Antti Lukats here.

 

 

 

 

 

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About the Author
  • Be sure to join the Xilinx LinkedIn group to get an update for every new Xcell Daily post! ******************** Steve Leibson is the Director of Strategic Marketing and Business Planning at Xilinx. He started as a system design engineer at HP in the early days of desktop computing, then switched to EDA at Cadnetix, and subsequently became a technical editor for EDN Magazine. He's served as Editor in Chief of EDN Magazine, Embedded Developers Journal, and Microprocessor Report. He has extensive experience in computing, microprocessors, microcontrollers, embedded systems design, design IP, EDA, and programmable logic.