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Mycroft’s Privacy-Centric Voice Assistant Kickstarter Project based on Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC hits 400% funding, gets Fast Company article, and video

by Xilinx Employee on ‎02-05-2018 11:23 AM (4,316 Views)

 

 

Last week, the Mycroft Mark II Privacy-Centric Open Voice Assistant Kickstarter Project, which is based on Aaware’s far-field Sound Capture Platform and the Xilinx Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC, hit 300% funding on Kickstarter. Today, the pledge level hit 400%—$200k—with 1235 backers. There are still 18 days left in the funding campaign; still time for you to get in on this very interesting, multi-talented smart speaker and low-cost, open-source Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC development platform.

 

 

 

Mycroft Mark II Smart Speaker.jpg 

 

 

 

Meanwhile, there seems to be a new pledge level that I don’t recall: a $179 level that includes a 1080p video camera. That’s in addition to the touch screen and voice input, which gives the Mycroft Mark II an even more interesting user interface. There are only a limited number of $179 pledge options, with 177 remaining as of the posting of this blog.

 

In addition, Fast Company has also published an article on the Mycroft Mark I Kickstarter project titled “Can Mycroft’s Privacy-Centric Voice Assistant Take On Alexa And Google?” Be sure to take a look.

 

 

For more information about the Mycroft Mark II Open Voice Assistant, see:

 

 

 

 

 

For more information about Aaware’s far-field Sound Capture Platform, see:

 

 

 

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About the Author
  • Be sure to join the Xilinx LinkedIn group to get an update for every new Xcell Daily post! ******************** Steve Leibson is the Director of Strategic Marketing and Business Planning at Xilinx. He started as a system design engineer at HP in the early days of desktop computing, then switched to EDA at Cadnetix, and subsequently became a technical editor for EDN Magazine. He's served as Editor in Chief of EDN Magazine, Embedded Developers Journal, and Microprocessor Report. He has extensive experience in computing, microprocessors, microcontrollers, embedded systems design, design IP, EDA, and programmable logic.