UPGRADE YOUR BROWSER

We have detected your current browser version is not the latest one. Xilinx.com uses the latest web technologies to bring you the best online experience possible. Please upgrade to a Xilinx.com supported browser:Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer 11, Safari. Thank you!

Xilinx uses Amazon’s AWS EC2 for software development and regression testing

by Xilinx Employee on ‎01-24-2018 12:37 PM (19,475 Views)

 

Xcell Daily has covered the FPGA-accelerated AWS EC2 F1 instances from Amazon Web Services several times. The AWS EC2 F1 instances allows AWS customers to develop accelerated code in C, C++, OpenCL, Verilog, or VHDL and run it on Amazon servers augmented with hardware-accelerated cards based on multiple Xilinx Virtex UltraScale+ VU9P FPGAs. (See below.)

 

A new AWS case study titled “Xilinx Speeds Testing Time, Increases Developer Productivity Using AWS” turns the tables. It discusses Xilinx’s use of AWS services to speed development of Xilinx development software such as the Vivado and SDx development environments. Xilinx employs extensive regression testing when developing new releases of these complex tools and the resulting demand spikes called for more “elastic” server resources. (Amazon’s “EC2” designation stands for “Elastic Compute Cloud.”)

 

As the case study states:

 

 

“Xilinx addressed its infrastructure-scaling problem by migrating to a high-performance computing (HPC) cluster running on Amazon Web Services (AWS). ‘We evaluated several cloud providers and chose AWS because it had the best tools and most mature solution,’” says [Ambs] Kesavan, [software engineering and DevOps director at Xilinx].

 

 

 

 

For more information about Amazon’s AWS EC2 F1 instance in Xcell Daily, see:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Labels
About the Author
  • Be sure to join the Xilinx LinkedIn group to get an update for every new Xcell Daily post! ******************** Steve Leibson is the Director of Strategic Marketing and Business Planning at Xilinx. He started as a system design engineer at HP in the early days of desktop computing, then switched to EDA at Cadnetix, and subsequently became a technical editor for EDN Magazine. He's served as Editor in Chief of EDN Magazine, Embedded Developers Journal, and Microprocessor Report. He has extensive experience in computing, microprocessors, microcontrollers, embedded systems design, design IP, EDA, and programmable logic.