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Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 94: SDSoC In-depth Example Part 1

by Xilinx Employee ‎08-03-2015 08:40 AM - edited ‎08-04-2015 05:31 AM (14,272 Views)

 

By Adam Taylor

 

Having provided a very detailed nine-part introduction to SDSoC and related debugging procedures, I am now going to provide an in-depth example of how we can use SDSoC to develop for embedded applications. Over the next few blogs, this example will demonstrate the implementation of an AES-256 algorithm, in use since its selection in 1992 by the National Institute of Science and Technology for transmission of unclassified United States federal information. Because of this initial application, AES has become increasingly popular as a cryptographic standard in many other applications.

I have chosen this algorithm because it has become very popular in a wide range of embedded systems that require secure communications. Indeed, the Zynq SoC itself uses AES encryption for securing its secure boot configuration.

 

Of course encryption as just one layer in a security architecture (albeit an important layer). Predominant AES cryptographic uses within embedded systems include:

 

 

  • Protect data entering or leaving a system from unauthorized data access to prevent malicious interaction, particularly in industrial systems (when correctly protected from replay attacks etc.).

 

  • Protect data and/or critical information within an embedded system. Again, this prevents unauthorized data access should the equipment be subjected to reverse engineering or manipulation.

 

 

Both of the above uses can be seen as preventing unauthorized access to the data or control of the system.

 

AES stands for Advanced Encryption Standard. It is a symmetrical block cipher and can be used with varying key lengths of 128, 196, and 256 bits. The number of processing steps required to encrypt or decrypt data is determined by this key length. A block cipher means that the algorithm works on blocks of data. The AES algorithm operates on a fixed block size of 16 bytes at a time. Thus if we wish to encrypt fewer than 16 bytes, we must pad out the unused bytes.

 

As AES is symmetrical, the same actions and key are used to encrypt and decrypt information. This is unlike asymmetric algorithms such as RSA, where a different key is used to encrypt the data than is used to decrypt.

 

The AES encryption or decryption algorithm takes the following steps, which we will explore in depth in the next blog as we create initially the code:

 

 

  • Add Round Key – This first step is the only one that uses the encryption key.
  • Byte Substitution – This step uses a substitution box to substitute values for the bytes of data.
  • Shift Row – This step re-orders the results of the substitution.
  • Mix Column – This step performs a matrix multiplication.

 

The algorithm performs these steps a number of times. We also need to perform what is called key expansion to ensure we have sufficient information for each of the above loops. It is typical to call each of the above four steps when performing a round. Depending upon the key length, the algorithm performs 10, 12, or 14 rounds.

AES is designed for operation on bytes and is therefore easy to implement with code running on an embedded system processor. However, a number of steps in a round are well-suited for hardware acceleration as we will see over the next few blogs.

 

 

 

 

 

MicroZed Chronicles.jpg 

 

 

 

 

 

Now, you can have convenient, low-cost Kindle access to the first year of Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles for a mere $7.50. Click here.

 

 

Please see the previous entries in this MicroZed Chronicles series by Adam Taylor:

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 93: SDSoC Debugging with Linux Part 9

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 92: SDSoC Verification & Build Issues Part 8

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 91: More on High-Level Synthesis and SDSoC, Part 7

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 90: Introduction to High-Level Synthesis and SDSoC, Part 6

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 89: SDSoC Optimization, Part 5

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 88: SDSoC Part 4—a look under the hood

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 87: Getting SDSoC up and running Part 3

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 86: Getting SDSoC up and running

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 85: SDSoC—the first instalment

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed(ish) Chronicles Part 84: Simple Communication Interfaces Part 4

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed(ish) Chronicles Part 83: Simple Communication Interfaces Part 3

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed(ish) Chronicles Part 82: Simple Communication Interfaces Part 2

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed(ish) Chronicles Part 81: Simple Communication Interfaces

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 80: LWIP Stack Configuration

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Chronicles Part 79: Zynq SoC Ethernet Part III

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Chronicles Part 78: Zynq SoC Ethernet Part II

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Microzed Chronicles Part 77 – Introducing the Zynq SoC’s Ethernet

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 76: Constraints for Relatively Placed Macros

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles, Part 75: Placement Constraints – Pblocks

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles, Part 73: Physical Constraints

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles, Part 73: Working with other Zynq-Based Boards

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles, Part 72: Multi-cycle Constraints

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles, Part 70: Constraints—Clock Relationships and Avoiding Metastability

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles, Part 70: Constraints—Introduction to timing and defining a clock

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 69: Zynq SoC Constraints Overview

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 68: AXI DMA Part 3, the Software

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 67: AXI DMA II

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 66: AXI DMA

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 65: Profiling Zynq Applications II

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 64: Profiling Zynq Applications

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 63: Debugging Zynq Applications

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 62: Answers to a question on the Zynq XADC

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 61: PicoBlaze Part Six

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 60: The Zynq and the PicoBlaze Part 5—controlling a CCD

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 59: The Zynq and the PicoBlaze Part 4

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 58: The Zynq and the PicoBlaze Part 3

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 57: The Zynq and the PicoBlaze Part Two

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 56: The Zynq and the PicoBlaze

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 55: Linux on the Zynq SoC

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 54: Peta Linux SDK for the Zynq SoC

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 53: Linux and SMP

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 52: One year and 151,000 views later. Big, Big Bonus PDF!

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 51: Interrupts and AMP

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 50: AMP and the Zynq SoC’s OCM (On-Chip Memory)

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 49: Using the Zynq SoC’s On-Chip Memory for AMP Communications

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 48: Bare-Metal AMP (Asymmetric Multiprocessing)

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 47: AMP—Asymmetric Multiprocessing on the Zynq SoC

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 46: Using both of the Zynq SoC’s ARM Cortex-A9 Cores

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 44: MicroZed Operating Systems—FreeRTOS

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 43: XADC Alarms and Interrupts 

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles MicroZed Part 42: MicroZed Operating Systems Part 4

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles MicroZed Part 41: MicroZed Operating Systems Part 3

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles MicroZed Part 40: MicroZed Operating Systems Part Two

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles MicroZed Part 39: MicroZed Operating Systems Part One

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles MicroZed Part 38 – Answering a question on Interrupts

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 37: Driving Adafruit RGB NeoPixel LED arrays with MicroZed Part 8

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 36: Driving Adafruit RGB NeoPixel LED arrays with MicroZed Part 7

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 35: Driving Adafruit RGB NeoPixel LED arrays with MicroZed Part 6

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 34: Driving Adafruit RGB NeoPixel LED arrays with MicroZed Part 5

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 33: Driving Adafruit RGB NeoPixel LED arrays with the Zynq SoC

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 32: Driving Adafruit RGB NeoPixel LED arrays

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 31: Systems of Modules, Driving RGB NeoPixel LED arrays

 

 Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 30: The MicroZed I/O Carrier Card

 

Zynq DMA Part Two – Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 29

 

The Zynq PS/PL, Part Eight: Zynq DMA – Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 28  

 

The Zynq PS/PL, Part Seven: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 27

 

The Zynq PS/PL, Part Six: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 26

 

The Zynq PS/PL, Part Five: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 25

 

The Zynq PS/PL, Part Four: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 24

 

The Zynq PS/PL, Part Three: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 23

 

The Zynq PS/PL, Part Two: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 22

 

The Zynq PS/PL, Part One: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 21

 

Introduction to the Zynq Triple Timer Counter Part Four: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 20

 

Introduction to the Zynq Triple Timer Counter Part Three: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 19

 

Introduction to the Zynq Triple Timer Counter Part Two: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 18

 

Introduction to the Zynq Triple Timer Counter Part One: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 17

 

The Zynq SoC’s Private Watchdog: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 16

 

Implementing the Zynq SoC’s Private Timer: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 15

 

MicroZed Timers, Clocks and Watchdogs: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 14

 

More About MicroZed Interrupts: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 13

 

MicroZed Interrupts: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 12

 

Using the MicroZed Button for Input: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 11

 

Driving the Zynq SoC's GPIO: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 10

 

Meet the Zynq MIO: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 9

 

MicroZed XADC Software: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 8

 

Getting the XADC Running on the MicroZed: Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles Part 7

 

A Boot Loader for MicroZed. Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles, Part 6 

 

Figuring out the MicroZed Boot Loader – Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles, Part 5

 

Running your programs on the MicroZed – Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles, Part 4

 

Zynq and MicroZed say “Hello World”-- Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles, Part 3

 

Adam Taylor’s MicroZed Chronicles: Setting the SW Scene

 

Bringing up the Avnet MicroZed with Vivado

 

 

 

 

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About the Author
  • Be sure to join the Xilinx LinkedIn group to get an update for every new Xcell Daily post! ******************** Steve Leibson is the Director of Strategic Marketing and Business Planning at Xilinx. He started as a system design engineer at HP in the early days of desktop computing, then switched to EDA at Cadnetix, and subsequently became a technical editor for EDN Magazine. He's served as Editor in Chief of EDN Magazine, Embedded Developers Journal, and Microprocessor Report. He has extensive experience in computing, microprocessors, microcontrollers, embedded systems design, design IP, EDA, and programmable logic.